chickens
chicken breeds I have kept
light Sussex Bantam
photo of bantam Light Susseex rooster and hens.
Bantam Light Sussex Rooster and hens.
Old English breed.  Don't be misled by the term bantam, while these chickens are smallish they are bantam versions of the Light Sussex breed, which is a very large meat chicken.  So they are actually more of a medium sized chicken than a bantam. Light Sussex bantams are an excellent utility chicken very suited to be run as a family flock with a rooster.  This breed was my favourite and the one I kept for the longest period of time (12 years). 

The only negatives being that they were fairly average egg layers and they were much more prone to scaly mite than any of the other breeds I have kept.  I also lost a couple from becoming eggbound.

advantages/disadvantages summary


Advantages
  • Even tempered.
  • Hens make good mothers.
  • Hens regularly go broody, which is great if you have a rooster or access to fertile eggs for them to sit on.
  • Good meat chicken. (has a good sized carcase with plenty of meat on it when slaughtered.)
Disadvantages
  • Mediocre egg layers.
  • Longer than average moult period (no eggs laid during moulting).
  • Hens regularly go broody, which is a nuisance if you don't have a rooster or access fertile eggs for them to sit on.
  • More expensive than crossbreed chickens.
  • Has a slight tendency to become eggbound.
  • Susceptible to scaly mite.


Bantam light Sussex Rooster and hens.  This was my favourite breed and the one I kept for the longest period of time (12 years).  I reluctantly stopped keeping  them when I chose to stop running a rooster.  I did this because the neighbourhood was becoming a lot more built up and I felt this increased  the likelihood that I would get complaints about the rooster's crowing.